shoot   Watercolour Explorations   

Welcome! For you are here.

artchipel:

Christopher Payne (USA) - Textiles (2010-2014)

Christopher Payne specializes in the documentation of America’s vanishing architecture and industrial landscape. Trained as an architect, he is fascinated by how things are purposefully designed and constructed, and how they work. His first book, New York’s Forgotten Substations: The Power Behind the Subway, offered dramatic, rare views of the behemoth machines that are hidden behind modest facades in New York City. His second book, Asylum: Inside the Closed World of State Mental Hospitals, which includes an essay by the renowned neurologist Oliver Sacks, was the result of a seven-year survey of America’s vast and largely shuttered state mental institutions. Payne’s forthcoming book, North Brother Island: The Last Unknown Place in New York City, explores an uninhabited island of ruins in the East River. Payne’s photographs invoke the former grandeur of the site over different seasons, capturing hints of buried streets and infrastructure now reclaimed by nature, while also offering a unique glimpse into a city’s future without people.

Payne’s recent work, including a series in progress on the American textile industry, has veered away from the documentation of the obsolete towards a celebration of craftsmanship and small-scale manufacturing that are persevering in the face of global competition and evolutions in industrial processes. Nearing completion is One Steinway Place, a tour through the famous Steinway & Sons piano factory in Astoria, Queens. Here a team of skilled workers creates exquisite instruments considered to be some of the finest in the world. Payne captures moments of the choreographies of production and assembly, and inspects the parts and pieces of the instruments that will never be visible outside of the factory, telling a story of intricacy, precision, and care he fears is becoming all too rare in the American workplace.

© All images courtesy the artist

[more Christopher Payne | artist found at photojojo]

(via hoploid)

— 1 month ago with 1214 notes

chickpea-magazine:

Our summer issue is online now! Included in this jam-packed issue: a big summer BBQ, a vegan makeup guide for hot days, brand new book reviews, DIY deodorant, an Orlando FL city guide, how to make a perfect vegan ice sundae bar, what to do with summer tomatoes, and much more.

Preview it online
Help support us and grab a copy for yourself
Read more about us
Contribute to our next issue (deadline 7/1/14)

Enjoy! :)

LOVE THIS

— 1 month ago with 873 notes
drools over claw foot bathtub…

drools over claw foot bathtub…

(Source: le-sojorner, via greenlikebathwater)

— 3 months ago with 350 notes
bunnyfood:

"You’re gonna do great today."

bunnyfood:

"You’re gonna do great today."

(Source: awwsauce, via animalsconfusedbythings)

— 3 months ago with 35726 notes

instagram:

Sydney’s One Central Park, the World’s Tallest Vertical Garden

To see more photos and videos of the vertical garden, explore the Central Park location page on Instagram.

At Central Park in Sydney, Australia, a 33-floor residential building known as One Central Park houses the world’s tallest vertical garden. Designed by Parisian architect Jean Nouvel, the garden towers at 115 meters (380 feet) and showcases panels of greenery designed by French botanist Patrick Blanc. The panels, some of which are several stories tall, are scattered around the building’s facade and carry 450 types of plants (250 of which are local species).

In addition to the garden, One Central Park is also known for the cantilever that juts out from the top floors of the building. A heliostat of motorized mirrors is installed underneath the cantilever, reflecting sunlight to various areas of the garden. LED art installations designed by French light artist Yann Kersalé are also built into the cantilever, lighting up the environment throughout the night.

— 3 months ago with 3342 notes

myampgoesto11:

Candaş Şişman: I/P/O-cle, 2013

Light Installation 

Lenses, light, mirror, sound, container, fog
1200X240X240 cm

I – Input P – Process 
O – Output
cle – Cycle

IPOcle is an installation simulating the way we perceive the reality that exist in our physical world and the various layers, variables, cycles that are present in this process of perceiving. With the senses that we have, we can perceive only a limited portion of the physical reality that surrounds us. This perceived physicality keeps altering as it goes through many layers and processes (biological and psychological) in our brains. These perceptions draw our perceptual schemas and these schemas in turn shape the reality we perceive. Our perceptions and what we perceive, therefore, constantly reshape call each other into being, as in a vicious cycle. At this point, how can we define what reality really is, what constant can we refer to, and aren’t we supposed to look at this issue in a more holistic and intertwined manner?

The IPOCle is made of a strong light source, lenses, a convex mirror, a fog machine and a sound system; installed inside a dark container. The light source is located so that the goes through the lenses, hung one after another. The refracted light reaches the mirror. The convex mirror transforms the light and reflects it back. The fog machine keeps running to make the dispersed light visible for us; while a base frequency keeps running in the background.

The light and the light source describe physical reality and input / The lenses: The process and various factors of perception / The mirror: What is perceived, the output and the cycle.

The artist has preferred to make use of common grounds that various studies meet; instead of basing all his work on a single research or researcher. Therefore, the I/P/O-cle project also focuses on the relations between various research topics and the patterns that reveal as a result of these relations. Şişman’s choice of research topics are about physics and neuro-sciences. “Perception” is at the intersection of these fields, therefore is the base for the project’s hybrid structure.

My Amp Goes To 11Twitter | Instagram

— 3 months ago with 378 notes